Print

Lessons >> Browse Articles >> Math

Rate

Telling Time to 5 Minutes

By - Megan Lloyd

By – Megan Lloyd Primary Subject – Math Grade Level – 2

Relationship to State Standards:

Academic Standards and Assessment for Mathematics
  • Numbers, Number Systems and Number Relationships 2.1.3 – A. Count using whole numbers (to 10,000) and by 2’s, 3’s, 5’s, 10’s, 25’s and 100’s.
  • Measurement and Estimation 2.3.3 – A. Compare measurable characteristics of different objects on the same dimension (e.g., time, temperature, area, length, capacity, perimeter).
  • Measurement and Estimation 2.3.3 – C. Determine and compare elapsed time.
  • Measurement and Estimation 2.3.3 – D. Tell time (analog and digital) to the minute.
  • Measurement and Estimation 2.3.3 – G. Estimate and verify measurements. Demonstrate that a single object has different attributes that can be measured in different ways (e.g., length, mass, weight, time, area, temperature, capacity, perimeter).
  • Mathematical Problem Solving and Communication 2.3.3 – A. Use appropriate problem-solving strategies (e.g., guess and check, working backwards).
  • Mathematical Problem Solving and Communication 2.3.3 – C. Select and use an appropriate method, materials and strategy to solve problems, including mental mathematics, paper and pencil and concrete objects.
  • Algebra and Functions 2.8.3 – A. Recognize, describe, extend, create and replicate a variety to patterns including attribute, activity, number and geometric patterns.
  • Statistics and Data Analysis 2.6.3 – A. Gather, organize, and display data using pictures, tallies, charts, bar graphs and pictographs.

Objectives:

  • Students will be able to experiment with the concept of elapsed time.
  • Students will model how to tell time to five minutes using an analog clock.
  • Students will be able to work in groups in order to model story problems that demonstrate counting by 5 minute intervals.

Cross-Curricular Integration: Reading and writing.

Materials: Demonstration clock, analog clock for each student, index cards, markers, masking tape, string and math journals.

New Vocabulary: Minute

Instructional Procedure:

Anticipatory Set

  • The teacher will introduce the lesson by explaining to the students that we will do a fun activity to begin the lesson.
  • The teacher will explain that they are going to have the opportunity to guess how long one minute is.
  • Instruct the students to close their eyes.
  • Explain to the students that each child should raise a hand when he or she thinks one minute is up.
  • The teacher will explain that she will clap her hands when the minute is up.
  • The teacher will distribute to each child an analog clock.
  • The teacher will review the parts of the analog clock face with the students. Sample questions: Which hand shows the hour? Answer: The shorter one. What does the longer hand tell us? Answer: Minutes
  • The teacher will review finding time to the hour and half-hour by writing a time on the board.
  • The teacher will ask the students to find that time with their clocks. Samples to use: 10:00, 1:30, 3:00, 5:30

Developmental Activities

  • The teacher will explain to the students that they will be learning how to tell time to 5 minutes today.
  • The teacher will show the students that there are 5 tick marks from one number to the next number on the clock face.
  • The teacher will explain that each tick mark stands for 1 minute, so they can count by 5 to find the minutes after the hour.
  • The teacher will instruct the students to look at their clock face and count by fives in unison, noting each number on the clock as they count.
  • The teacher will display a large human clock model in the front of the room.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that one child is needed to be the minute hand of the clock.
  • The teacher will instruct this child to point from one number to the next.
  • The teacher will explain that the rest of the class needs to count by fives as this student points to each number.
  • The teacher will allow as many children as possible an opportunity to be the minute hand.
  • The teacher will move the large human clock model off to the side and instruct the students to look at their own clock faces again.
  • The teacher will show 9:35 on her demonstration clock.
  • The teacher will ask the students to find out how many minutes have passed since 9 o’clock. Answer: Start at 12:00 and count by fives until you reach the 7.
  • The teacher will ask the students some similar questions. Samples to use: 5:15, 5:20, 2:00, 2:35, 3:55, 4:05.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that they will be working in groups to model story problems to demonstrate counting by 5 minute intervals.
  • The teacher will explain that cooperation is necessary and that students should keep their voices quite so that other students will not be disturbed. The teacher will also remind the students that this is not an opportunity to socialize. Remind the students that only the subject of math is to be discussed in the groups.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that each group will receive a pack of 6 story problems.
  • The teacher will explain that the students will be working in groups to solve these problems by modeling the beginning time and the ending time of the story problem.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that they must write down their answers and draw a picture of the answer using the recording sheet provided by the teacher.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that they will have 15 minutes to complete the group work.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that when the 15 minutes are up the teacher will call the students to the discussion carpet to talk about the answers that the groups found.
  • The teacher will explain that if groups finish early they may quiz each other on times. For example, have one child tell the other person in the group to find 5:35 on their clock. Students may switch roles.
  • The teacher will explain to the students that the person who is sitting directly next to you will be your partner. If there are not enough partners three children may work together.
Sample Story Problems to be used: 1. We walked to the school library. We left at 11 o’clock. We returned to the classroom 25 minutes later. What time did we get back? Answer: 11:25 2. We have a 15 minute recess in the morning. It begins at 11:00. When is recess over? Answer: 11:15 3. I took the attendance sheet to the office. I left the classroom at 9:30. I was back in the classroom 10 minutes later. What time is it? Answer: 9:40 4. Today we have P.E. class at 2:00. It lasts 30 minutes. When is P.E. over? Answer: 2:30 5. 50 minutes past 2 o’clock is 2:50. 55 minutes past 2 o’clock is 2:55. What time is 60 minutes past 2 o’clock. Answer: 3:00 6. Hailey leaves school at 3:25. She gets to her piano lessons 5 minutes later. What time does she get to her lesson? Answer: 3:30

Closure

  • The teacher will ask for volunteers to come up to the board to show the class how they solved the problems.
  • The teacher will ask the students to pass their worksheets to the front of the room so that the teacher may collect them.
  • The teacher will ask the students to go back to their seats and take out their math journals.
  • The teacher will ask the students to write in their math journals a response to this question: Why is telling time important?

Assessment:

  • Participation and alertness during the opening activity.
  • Observe students during the group work activity to check for understanding.
  • The teacher will collect the problems that are done in the groups to assess the answers and drawings.

Special Needs Adaptations – Visual Impaired Learner:

  • Provide the student with a larger clock face.
  • Provide the student with larger index cards with larger writing during the group work portion.
  • Have this student be the minute hand so that the child will not be squinting to see what is going on during instruction time.

Technology Integration:

  • One computer in the classroom: The teacher will display the website: http://arcytech.org/java/clock/clock_history.html. This website explains the history of clocks and also provides examples of different kinds of clocks. For example, the sun, sundial clocks, water clocks, pendulum clocks, and quartz crystal clocks are given as examples of different kinds of clocks. The teacher can show this website on the computer screen so that students can see what each type of clock looks like. An explanation of what each type of clock is provided and the teacher can explain how the clocks work by reading the captions under the pictures to the students.
  • Six computers in the classroom: After students have finished writing in their math journals the teacher will instruct the students to go to the computer cluster. Have the students go to the website: http://www.cyberbee.com/games/timeteacher.html. The students will have the opportunity to play the game called “Time Teacher.” In this game students have to drag the hands of the clock to show the correct time. When the student thinks they have the right time, they press OK. If the students answer incorrectly they can click the clock face afterward to view the correct answer. Students may work in groups of two to play this game. If there are not enough computers the teacher can have the students play the game before of after school officially begins so that every student has the chance to play.
  • Each child has a computer in the classroom: Instruct the students to go to the website http://www.primarygrades.com/time/start.htm. Students will get the opportunity to play the game called “What Time Is It?” In this game students look at the analog clock and tell the time. They then pick the digital clock that shows the same time. This game has 10 questions.

Teaching School Finder

Save time in your search for a teaching degree program. Use Teaching's School Finder to locate schools online and in your area.

Get Info

* In the event that we cannot find a program from one of our partner schools that matches your specific area of interest, we may show schools with similar or unrelated programs.