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15 Popular Interview Questions Answered

15 Popular Interview Questions Answered

Candace Davies | A+ Resumes for Teachers

Preparing for an interview is probably the most overlooked phase of securing a new job position. Everyone thinks it is easy until they enter an interview room in front of a panel 
of educators who are judging every move and every word. Then, reality sinks in! The panel might include the superintendent of the school district, school principals, teachers, and parents, making it critical to address your answers to all involved. The more you prepare for an interview, the better your odds of securing a job offer will be. 



Listed here are 15 common job interview questions and possible answers to give you some ideas on what to include in your responses. 

Keep in mind, these are just possibilities and should be used with discretion. Each candidate’s background, teaching style, and experiences are different, and the answers should reflect those differences.

There is one thing you must remember that applies to everyone who interviews — don’t lie! Also, keep in mind, that you should tailor your answers to address the specific needs of a school or school district in which you 
are interested.

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1)  Tell me a little bit about yourself.




Oh, yes, this is the question that is most likely to be asked first. I call it a two minute commercial about yourself. This is a great opportunity to sell yourself to the school
district representatives. Keep in mind, if it is the first question asked, it will set the stage for the interview, so it needs to be extremely strong. Don’t be too modest. This will provide an overview, an introduction, to you. You might start by stating, “As you can see from my resume….” and then mention your degrees and certifications and give a quick run down of your relevant experience. The last 1 ½ minutes should be used to communicate your strengths and skills and what you can do to enhance education in their district. In other words, they are asking “Why should we hire you?” Practice this carefully. You need a few sentences that answer that question at the end of your response. Also, at the end, you may want to mention why you would enjoy working for the school district in the position for which they are hiring.





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