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5 Tips for Bonding with New Teaching Colleagues

5 Tips for Bonding with New Teaching Colleagues

Dorit Sasson | Teaching.monster.com

It is not practical for any new teacher to work in isolation. New teachers who do not feel nurtured in their school environment, are usually to first to consider the prospect of leaving their teaching positions. While starting out can be uncomfortable, there are ways to approach teachers that can naturally lead to collaboration which is a necessary and vital ingredient for new teacher survival.

If you are new to your school or have changed grades and don’t know your co-teachers very well, consider the following ideas to help you bond with your new colleagues:

1. Quick 5 minute idea share.

Approach a teacher with a lesson plan or teaching idea and say: “What do you think of this idea? I’d like to get your feedback on it? Let me know what you think.” Why not share a worksheet or an activity that went well? This is great for relationship building. Avoid keeping things to yourself.

2. Volunteer to take an active role in a professional learning/teaching committee.

You don’t have to spend oodles of volunteer time just enough to stay connected. Are you good at organizing or filing? Perhaps volunteer to organize materials for a staff in-service day. If you aren’t sure if any volunteer work is needed, ask around.

3. Start an email chain.

This is perhaps the least time consuming activity which can be easily implemented at any time of day. It’s the best solution for harried new teachers You can decide on the purpose or theme of the email beforehand. Is it a quick check-in or to disseminate important information? Perhaps you want to just share a few ideas. Again, you can use tactic #1 to help start the conversation along.

Next Page: Tip #4>>

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