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40 Active Learning Strategies for Active Students

40 Active Learning Strategies for Active Students

Julia G. Thompson | Teaching.monster.com

11. Ask students to involve themselves in their learning by using review strategies such as these:

o Associate body motions with the material
o Quiz themselves
o Use colored pens to rewrite the main ideas
o Recite or sing the information
o Create mnemonic devices
o Teach the information to a classmate
o Create a vivid image of the topic
o Restate information in their own words
o Create a quiz and give it to a classmate

12. Have students make flashcards and use them to study together. Flashcards with sketches or drawings are more effective than those where the words are just written out in haste.

13. Ask students to model the right way to do something or answer a question. Peer models can be powerful motivators.

14. If your subject matter lends itself, have students role play in brief sketches.

15. Do a Whip Around. Have students stand and quickly recite a fact or other item from the lesson before sitting down.

16. Go to this fun site: http://www.darwinawards.com and browse until you find a story that would appeal to your students. Print the story. Cut it into strips, mix them up, and have students put them back into order. The innate appeal of these silly stories will appeal to students with a sense of humor.

17. Offer students opportunities to learn their vocabulary words and other facts in puzzles of various types. The easiest site to use for this is http://www.puzzlemaker.com.

18. Have students use a site such as http://www.surveymonkey.com to create and administer their own free surveys about a topic your class is studying.

19. Have your students stage a talk show to interview characters from fiction or history or in any other discipline. Choose an outgoing and reliable student to be the host, and let that student interview other students, who pose as guests.

20. Have students sit in a circle. To play, one student begins a story, stops after a few sentences, and then points to another student, who continues the story. You can adapt this activity to teach vocabulary, order of events, facts, or other information.

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